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erectile dysfunction and natural testosterone/progresterone

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10:37 pm
October 14, 2013


USMCEagle

Avatar of USMCEagle

posts 96

I used Dr. Pensanti's testesterone cream for men and the identical progestrine cream and they worked great but I did the cleanses first. If that helps. Thanks guys and keep rollin' Did anyone see my truck Saturday at the memorial? I honked and waved to the cameras Cool so I'm a star now!

10:29 pm
October 14, 2013


VickiY.

Avatar of VickiY.

posts 989

I am sorry, Laura; you are right. I did not specifically address whether or not your husband could use Dr. Helen's bio-identical progesterone cream and testosterone cream. Because Dr. Helen's creams are made from natural plant sources and homeopathic ingredients, there may be no difficulty for him to use them; however, I strongly suggest taking the label information for both of those creams to your husband's pharmacist to insure that nothing in those creams would interfere with, or be enhanced by, the medications he is taking. My immediate thought, when I read your post, was that it is most likely that the medications he is taking are causing his inability to fully perform sexually.

I encouraged the use of NSC-100, RenewLife Ultimate Flora Critical Care and Dr. Young's Protein Shake Package, along with dietary corrections (the Raw Cleanse, followed by the Anti-fungal Food Choices list) because such practice can help with sexual function.

Following the Raw Cleanse for 2-4 weeks may be helpful in resolveing the ED all by itself; although, I do believe it is important for anyone with Parkinson's, especially taking medications that effect hormonal balance the way those he is taking will, to take the other supplements suggested, along with dietary changes.

Please let us know what the Pharmacist says about Dr. Helen's Creams being used with the medications he is taking.

All the Best…Vicki

9:22 pm
October 14, 2013


USMCEagle

Avatar of USMCEagle

posts 96

Hey Vicki, thank you for that answer and the great video link, is that for real?

A lot of us were exposed to Agent Orange and have Parkinson's. I tell them to use the woben-stull you like and it works great but it looks like this is faster.

7:09 pm
October 14, 2013


lauramathys

Avatar of lauramathys

posts 3

Dr Thornton, N.D. (Ret) said:

Hi lauramathys

Let me weigh in here also. The answer below is very comprehensive and I can appreciate you may not have the time to go through it.

There are many physical and psychological causes of erectile dysfunction, and based on the medications he is taking, it is not safe for him to alter his hormonal balance without first discussing this with his primary care practitioner. So the specific answer to your question is no, he may not safely use any form of testosterone or progesterone.

Dr. Thornton,

Thank you for your direct answer to my direct question.

 

The answer initially given was very comprehensive.  I was already very familiar with the entirety of the information initially presented.  We will seek the advice of the PCP before proceeding further with possible hormonal alteration.  Thank you again.

7:05 pm
October 14, 2013


Dr Thornton, N.D. (Ret)

Avatar of Dr Thornton, N.D. (Ret)

posts 35

Hi Foghorn,

Here are some of the possible causes of erectile dysfunction; and this is by no means a conclusive list. In most cases, erectile dysfunction is caused by something listed here (and posted in no order).

Physical:

  • Certain prescription and OTC medications
  • Heart disease and circulatory issues including clogged blood vessels or high blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Metabolic syndrome, a condition involving increased blood pressure, high insulin levels, body fat around the waist and high cholesterol
  • Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis or any neurological problem
  • Low testosterone
  • Peyronie's disease (scar tissue inside the penis)
  • Tobacco use
  • Alcoholism or substance abuse
  • Treatments for prostate cancer or enlarged prostate
  • Surgeries or injuries that affect the pelvic area or spinal cord 

Psychological issues play a key role in triggering the physical events that cause an erection; starting with feelings of arousal. A number of things can interfere with sexual feelings and cause or worsen erectile dysfunction. These include:

  • Relationship problems due to stress, poor communication or other concerns including fear of performance disappointment
  • Depression, anxiety or other mental health conditions
  • Stress

5:32 pm
October 14, 2013


FogHorn

Avatar of FogHorn

posts 40

Post edited 6:39 pm – October 14, 2013 by FogHorn


What are some of the causes of erectile dysfunction?

I know some of the obvious, like being married to Lorena Bobbit would cause performance anxiety, but what about some less obvious causes?
Thank you.

5:19 pm
October 14, 2013


Dr Thornton, N.D. (Ret)

Avatar of Dr Thornton, N.D. (Ret)

posts 35

Hi lauramathys

Let me weigh in here also. The answer below is very comprehensive and I can appreciate you may not have the time to go through it.

There are many physical and psychological causes of erectile dysfunction, and based on the medications he is taking, it is not safe for him to alter his hormonal balance without first discussing this with his primary care practitioner. So the specific answer to your question is no, he may not safely use any form of testosterone or progesterone.

7:25 am
October 14, 2013


lauramathys

Avatar of lauramathys

posts 3

Thank you for the information.  That is a lot to evaluate/digest.  Unfortunately, you did no answer the original question that I posed.  You mentioned that there were "many" supplements that could not be taken with Parkinson's medications.  You did not specifically address whether or not natural testosterone and progresterone were safe for him to use with his current medications and the expected efficacy toward relief of the symptoms of erectile dysfunction.  Please add information specific to this question.  Thank you.

10:16 pm
October 13, 2013


VickiY.

Avatar of VickiY.

posts 989

Parkinson's is commonly considered to be caused by environmental toxicity, such as chemicals, metals, or may be at least partially caused by fungal or parasitic infestation, etc.

ED is common among those using prescription medications for Parkinson's Disease. Mirapex may be causing this; however, the other medications may also contribute to ED (see below). Unfortunately, there are not many supplements your husband can take while using the medications he is taking; in fact, there are many over-the-counter medications for colds, flu, headaches and other common maladies he should not take with the prescriptions he takes for Parkinson's Disease. One of the supplements we recommend most for those with any neurological disorder, but that cannot be taken with Parkinson's prescriptions, are any enzyme formulation (such as WobenzymN, NSC Immzymes, NSC Superzymes or other digestive enzymes), as some of his medications have blood thinning action and the combination, as it is, can cause bruising and potentially severe internal bleeding.

I do suggest using NSC-100 to enhance his immune system function and RenewLife Ultimate Flora Critical Care to rebuild lost beneficial flora in his gastrointestinal and genitorinary tract. Also, diet is extremely important, since there are so many supplements he cannot take; we suggest having him follow the Raw Cleanse (but add Dr. Young's Protein Powder to the cleanse), followed by the Anti-fungal Food Choices list. Both are found in the Reference Center and are available to Platinum Members. Also, Platinum Members receive discounts on the NSC and RenewLife products. If you are interested, you should have received an email when you signed-up for Trial Membership that provided a list of Participating Discount Providers and their discounts when you purchase direct through them.

L-glutathione also would be helpful but it is best administered intravenously. I highly recommend the book by Dr. David Perlmutter, "BrainRecovery.com." You may also search for Dr. David Perlmutter through any search engine (PerlHealth.com) and observe videos of some of his Parkinson's patients who are now fully ambulatory! We think this is particularly interesting! PERLMUTTER VIDEO ON YOU TUBE

Here is more information about the medications he is taking:

MIRAPEX

What special precautions should I follow? Before taking pramipexole,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to pramipexole or any other medications, or any of the ingredients in pramipexole tablets. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a list of the inactive ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications vitamins, nutritional supplements and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following:      amantadine (Symadine, Symmetrel); antidepressants; antihistamines; cimetidine (Tagamet); diltiazem (Cardiazem, Dilacor XR); ; levodopa (Larodopa, Dopar, in Sinemet); medications for allergies, anxiety, mental    illness, nausea, and seizures; metoclopramide (Reglan); quinidine; quinine; ranitidine (Zantac, Zantac 75); sedatives; sleeping pills; tranquilizers; triamterene (Dyrenium, in Dyazide, in Maxzide); and verapamil (Isoptin, Calan, Verelan, and others). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had an urge to gamble that was difficult to control, trouble controlling movement of your muscles,a sleep disorder other than restless legs syndrome, dizziness, fainting, low blood      pressure, or heart or kidney disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. If you become pregnant while taking pramipexole, call your doctor. Do not breast-feed while you are taking pramipexole.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell your doctor or dentist that you are taking pramipexole.
  • you should know that pramipexole may make you drowsy or may cause you to suddenly fall asleep during your regular daily activities.  You might not feel drowsy before you suddenly fall asleep. Do not drive a car or operate machinery at the beginning of your treatment until you know how pramipexole will affect you. If you suddenly fall asleep while you are doing something such as watching television or riding in a car, or if you become very drowsy, call your doctor. Do not drive or operate machinery until you talk to your doctor.
  • remember that alcohol can add to the drowsiness caused by this medication. Tell your doctor if you regularly drink alcoholic beverages.
  • you should know that pramipexole may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, nausea, fainting, or sweating when you get up too quickly from a sitting or lying position. This is more common when you first start taking pramipexole, or when your dose is increased. To avoid this problem, get out of the chair or bed slowly, resting your feet on the floor for a few minutes before standing up.

What side effects can this medication cause? Pramipexole may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • nausea
  • abnormal body movements and motions
  • weakness
  • dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep
  • difficulty remembering or thinking
  • confusion
  • abnormal thoughts or dreams
  • heartburn
  • constipation
  • diarrhea
  • loss of appetite
  • weight loss
  • dry mouth
  • joint pain
  • frequent urination or urgent need to urinate
  • difficulty urinating or pain when urinating
  • decreased sexual interest or ability
  • swelling of the arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor
immediately:

  • hallucinations (seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist)
  • changes in vision
  • chest pain
  • shortness of breath
  • dark, red, or cola-colored urine
  • muscle tenderness
  • muscle stiffness or aching
  • muscle weakness

Some people who took medications such as pramipexole to treat Parkinson's disease or restless legs syndrome developed gambling problems, an increased interest in sex, or overeating problems. There is not enough information to tell whether the people developed these problems because they took the medication or for other reasons. Call your doctor if you have difficulty controlling any of these behaviors. Tell your family members about these risks so that they can call the doctor even if you do not realize that your behavior has become a problem.

People who have Parkinson's disease may have a greater risk of developing melanoma (a type of skin cancer) than people who do not have Parkinson's disease. There is not enough information to tell whether medications used to treat Parkinson's disease such as pramipexole increase the risk of developing skin cancer. You should have regular skin examinations to check for melanoma while you are taking pramipexole even if you do not have Parkinson's disease.

AZILECT

What special precautions should I follow? Before taking rasagiline,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to rasagiline, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in rasagiline tablets. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor if you are taking cough and cold products containing dextromethorphan (DM; Delsym, Hold, Robitussin CoughGels, Vicks 44 Cough Relief, in Robitussin DM, others), cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril), meperidine (Demerol), methadone (Dolophine, Methadose), propoxyphene (Darvon, in Darvocet-N, others), St. John's wort, or tramadol (Ultram, in Ultracet). Also tell your doctor if you are taking MAO inhibitors such as phenelzine (Nardil), selegiline (Eldepryl), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) or have stopped taking them within the past two weeks. Your doctor may tell you not to take rasagiline if you are taking one or more of these medications.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following:      amphetamines (Adderall, Dexedrine, DextroStat); antidepressants; cimetidine (Tagamet); decongestants placed in the eye or nose; diet or weight-control products containing ephedrine; fluoroquinolone antibiotics including ciprofloxacin (Cipro), gatifloxacin (Tequin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), and ofloxacin (Floxin); fluvoxamine (Luvox); medications to treat asthma; medications to treat high blood pressure; medications to      treat mental illness; medications to treat pain; phenylpropanolamine (not available in the U.S.); pseudoephedrine (PediaCare, Sudafed, Suphedrine, others); and ticlopidine (Ticlid). Tell your doctor if you are taking fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem) or have stopped taking it within the past 5 weeks. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had high blood pressure, mental illness or psychosis; kidney, or liver disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking rasagiline, call your doctor.
  • you should know that rasagiline may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, nausea, sweating, and fainting when you get up too quickly from a lying position. This is more common during the first 2 months of taking rasagiline. To avoid this problem, get out of bed slowly, resting your feet on the floor for a few minutes before standing up.
  • you should know that rasagiline may cause serious, life-threatening high blood pressure when taken with certain medications or foods. Carefully follow your doctor's instructions about medications and foods to be avoided. Call your doctor right away if you have a severe headache, blurred vision, or any of the other symptoms listed below as serious side effects.
  • you should know that people who have Parkinson's disease have a higher risk of melanoma (a type of skin cancer) than people who do not have Parkinson's disease. It is not known whether this increased risk is caused by Parkinson's disease, medications used for Parkinson's disease such as rasagiline, or other factors. You should have regular visits with a dermatologist to examine your skin for melanoma.
  • you should know that some people who took rasagiline or similar medications to treat Parkinson's disease experienced intense urges to gamble, increased sexual urges, and other urges that they were unable to control. Tell your doctor if you experience new or increased gambling urges, increased sexual urges, or other intense urges while taking rasagiline.

What side effects can this medication cause? Rasagiline may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • mild headache
  • joint or neck pain
  • heartburn
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • stomach pain
  • constipation
  • diarrhea
  • loss of appetite
  • weight loss
  • flu-like symptoms
  • fever
  • sweating
  • red, swollen, and/or itchy eyes
  • dry mouth
  • swollen gums
  • unsteadiness, wobbliness, or lack of coordination
  • involuntary, repeated body movements
  • lack of energy
  • sleepiness
  • abnormal dreams
  • depression
  • pain, burning, numbness, or tingling in the hands or feet
  • rash
  • bruising or purple discoloration on skin

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

  • severe headache
  • blurred vision
  • seizures
  • chest pain
  • shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • confusion
  • unconsciousness
  • slow or difficult speech
  • dizziness or faintness
  • weakness or numbness of an arm or leg
  • hallucinating (seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist)
  • extreme restlessness
  • difficulty thinking clearly or understanding reality

Rasagiline may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

Symptoms of rasagiline overdose may occur as late as 1 to 2 days after the overdose. Symptoms of overdose may include the following:

  • drowsiness
  • dizziness
  • faintness
  • irritability
  • hyperactivity
  • agitation or restlessness
  • severe headache
  • hallucinating
  • confusion
  • loss of coordination
  • difficulty opening the mouth
  • rigid body spasm that may include an arched back
  • twitching muscles
  • seizures
  • loss of consciousness
  • fast or irregular heart beat
  • pain in the area between the stomach and chest
  • difficulty breathing or slowed breathing
  • diarrhea
  • fever
  • sweating
  • cool, clammy skin
  • shivering
  • increase in pupil size (black circle in middle of eye)

SINEMET

What special precautions should I follow? Before taking levodopa and carbidopa,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to levodopa and carbidopa any other medications, or any of the ingredients in levodopa and carbidopa tablets. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor if you are taking phenelzine (Nardil) or tranylcypromine (Parnate) or if you have stopped taking them in the past 2 weeks. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take levodopa and carbidopa.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following:     antidepressants ('mood elevators') such as amitriptyline (Elavil), amoxapine (Asendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Adapin, Sinequan), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), and trimipramine (Surmontil); antihistamines; haloperidol (Haldol); ipratropium (Atrovent); iron pills and vitamins containing iron; isocarboxazid (Marplan); isoniazid (INH, Nydrazid); medications for high blood pressure, irritable bowel disease, mental illness, motion sickness, nausea, ulcers, or urinary problems; metoclopramide (Reglan); papaverine (Pavabid); phenytoin (Dilantin); rasagiline (Azilect); risperidone (Risperdal); and selegiline (Eldepryl). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had glaucoma, melanoma (skin cancer), or a skin growth that has not
         been diagnosed. Your doctor may tell you not to take levodopa and carbidopa.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had hormone problems; asthma; emphysema; mental illness; diabetes; ulcers; heart attacks; irregular heartbeat; or blood vessel, heart, kidney, liver or lung disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking levodopa and carbidopa, call your doctor.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking levodopa and carbidopa.
  • you should know that while taking levodopa and carbidopa, your saliva, urine, or sweat may become a dark color (red, brown, or black). This is harmless, but your clothing may become stained.
  • if you have phenylketonuria (PKU, an inherited condition in which a special diet must be followed to prevent mental retardation), you should know that the orally disintegrating tablets contain aspartame that forms phenylalanine.

What side effects can this medication cause? Levodopa and carbidopa may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • dizziness
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • loss of appetite
  • diarrhea
  • dry mouth
  • constipation
  • change in sense of taste
  • forgetfulness or confusion
  • nervousness
  • nightmares
  • difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep
  • headaches
  • weakness
  • increased sweating
  • drowsiness

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

  • unusual or uncontrolled movements of the mouth, tongue, face, head, neck, arms, and legs
  • fast, irregular, or pounding heartbeat
  • depression
  • thoughts of death or killing oneself
  • hallucinating (seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist)
  • swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • hoarseness
  • difficulty swallowing or breathing
  • hives
  • black and tarry stools
  • red blood in stools
  • bloody vomit
  • vomit that looks like coffee grounds

6:47 pm
October 13, 2013


lauramathys

Avatar of lauramathys

posts 3

Dr. Helen has suggested that I seek advice here before trying natural testosterone combined with progesterone cream.

My man has had hypertension and Parkinson's for several years.  Both are well controlled on his current regimen of meds (listed below).  His BP is stable at 125/86, so not over-controlled.  He is 55 years old.  He is not overweight.  Recently, with no change in meds or lifestyle, he has begun experiencing difficulty maintaining an erection in spite of feelings of extreme arousal. 

His med regimen follows:  Sinemet 25 mg twice daily, Mirapex ER 3 mg one daily, Azilect 1 mg one daily, Lisinopril 10 mg once daily.

Traditional ED meds are cost prohibitive as he has no medical insurance.  We are considering natural testosterone combined with progesterone cream to balance.  Your opinion/suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


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